Edgar Deen, Ernest Allen, W.R. Watt, and Sid W. Richardson at Northwoods Farm (detail)

Name: Edgar Deen, Ernest Allen, W.R. Watt, and Sid W. Richardson at Northwoods Farm (detail) | Artist:   Media: None | Year(s): September 13,  1947
Edgar Deen, Ernest Allen, W.R. Watt, and Sid W. Richardson at Northwoods Farm (detail) | September 13, 1947

About the Work

On September 13, 1947, four Fort Worth Fat Stock Show and Rodeo executives were honored with a surprise presentation of elaborate sterling silver and hand-tooled leather parade outfits custom-made by Edward H. Bohlin. Fellow Stock Show directors and friends presented the gifts, with inscribed plaques, at Northwoods Farm in north Fort Worth to Mayor F. Edgar Deen, Stock Show Manager; Ernest Allen, Stock Show Vice-President; and W. R. Watt, Sr., Stock Show President.

The fourth set was presented to Richardson, a Stock Show Director, by Amon Carter. Sid’s plaque took a humorous twist, making note of the Santa Fe Railroad’s cattle loading stop, “Primrose,” at Sid’s Dutch Branch Ranch on the eastern shore of Lake Benbrook. The plaque states that, “We, the citizens of Primrose, as a small token of the affection we feel toward him and appreciation of all that he has done for the spiritual, moral, cultural, civic and industrial advancement of our fine and growing city, present this silver mounted saddle . . . to our mayor, the Hon. Sid W. Richardson, so that when he rides forth to inspect his vast ranges and huge cattle herds he may do so in comfort and the residents thereof, whether quadrupeds or bipeds, may be properly impressed and show to him the deference and due one of his official position.” According to Peggy Jones Norment, former PBX Operator for the Richardson & Bass Oil Company, the plaque was but one example of the many jokes from Amon to his good friend.

Northwoods Stock Farm was owned by James M. North, Jr., editor of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and Vice-President of Carter Publications. The extensive farm was split years ago by the construction of I-35, and the only remnant of the farm is a renovated barn that now houses Shady Oak Barbeque & Grill.