Category Archives: From the Vault

Stock Show Spirit, Part One

In honor of the 118th Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, we invite you to get into the stock show spirit with a visit to the Sid Richardson Museum to view our legendary collection of the art of the West. As part of an ongoing series during the stock show, today we’re highlighting a special piece of the museum’s collection: Sid Richardson’s Bohlin Parade Saddle outfit.

Edward H. Bohlin Company, Parade Saddle and Outfit, 1947 Saddle: Leather, sterling silver, stainless steel, mohair, wool fleece, wood Vest and Chaps: Leather, sterling silver

Edward H. Bohlin Company, Parade Saddle and Outfit, 1947
Saddle: Leather, sterling silver, stainless steel, mohair, wool fleece, wood
Vest and Chaps: Leather, sterling silver

This saddle was made by Edward Bohlin in 1947 (pictured below). At the young age of 17, the Swedish Bohlin pursued his dreams of becoming a cowboy and moved all the way to Montana where he quickly developed a passion for fine saddles. Shortly after opening a small leather-working shop in Cody, Wyoming, Bohlin began a career in show business, making boots, saddles, and other costume pieces for Western movies. His pieces were both functional and fashionable works of art.Edward Bohlin

Edward H. Bohlin, Inc. catalog, 1927. Courtesy, Cabin Creek Enterprises LLC, www.cabincreekcds.com

Edward H. Bohlin, Inc. catalog, 1927. Courtesy, Cabin Creek Enterprises LLC, www.cabincreekcds.com

A saddle is one of the most important pieces of cowboy equipment. Can you name some of the major saddle parts?Bohlin Saddle Diagram

Happy Birthday, Schreyvogel!

The New York Herald, April 28, 1903

The New York Herald, April 28, 1903

 

 

Today marks the 153rd birthday of Charles Schreyvogel, one of the many artists represented in the Sid Richardson Museum’s collection. Known for his action scenes of the West, only Schreyvogel rivaled Remington in the public’s eye as the pair strived to elevate the subject from illustration to fine art. Comparisons between the two artists were common.

Not one to share the spotlight, Remington sharply criticized Schreyvogel’s painting Custer’s Demand in the New York Herald in 1903.  He takes the artist to task as Remington points out the historical inaccuracies in Schreyvogel’s recently unveiled painting (now housed in the Gilcrease Museum). “While I do not want to interfere with Mr. Schreyvogel’s hallucinations, I do object to his half baked stuff being considered seriously as history.”

Remington had for years been planning a painting of General Custer, and so was furious to discover that Schreyvogel had beaten him to the punch. No doubt learning that President Theodore Roosevelt was one of the painting’s most enthusiastic admirers added fuel to the fire. For his part, Schreyvogel never spoke unkindly about Remington and remained one of his greatest admirers.

Happy Birthday, Frederic!

Today marks the 152nd birthday of Frederic Remington. The artist was born on October 4, 1861. To celebrate this occasion, I thought it appropriate to share a fun fact.

Did you know Remington once stayed in Fort Worth? The artist passed through Texas many times on his trips to the Southwest. In 1888, Century Magazine had hired Remington to document the “Wild Tribes” in Arizona. During his return to New York, Remington spent a night in Fort Worth at the Ellis Hotel. At the time, the Ellis Hotel was located on the corner of 3rd and Throckmorton, which is just a block away from the present-day Sid Richardson Museum. The hotel burned down in 1891.

Courtesy of the Genealogy, History, and Archives Unit, Fort Worth Library. [Fort Worth Photographs from the Amon Carter, 73.67/35]

Courtesy of the Genealogy, History, and Archives Unit, Fort Worth Library. [Fort Worth Photographs from the Amon Carter, 73.67/35]

On July 1, 1888, after arriving in Henrietta, Texas, Remington wrote a letter to his wife, Eva. He mentions having spent a day in Fort Worth, where he “had a devil of a time.”

Remington Texas Letter 1888_Page_2

Original letter in possession of the Kansas State Historical Society, Robert Taft Papers, "Frederic Remington File."

Original letter in possession of the Kansas State Historical Society, Robert Taft Papers, “Frederic Remington File.”