Millie in Montana

In 1907, Charlie Russell painted Utica, also known as A Quite Day in Utica, a scene that is anything other than quiet. This work was a commission by the Lehman family, who had owned the general store in Utica, Montana. By this point, the family had moved to Lewiston and were wanting their former customer, the now-famous cowboy artist, to paint a picture to be used on a calendar to advertise their family store in Lewiston.

Every figure in this painting is said to be identifiable, but today I want to focus on just one. In the doorway of the general store is the owner, Charles Lehman. Next to him on his right is an African American woman, Millie Ringgold, a freed slave and prospector in the area.

Charles M. Russell | Utica (A Quiet day in Utica) | 1907 | Oil on canvas | 24 1/8 inches x 36 1/8 inches

Charles M. Russell | Utica (A Quiet day in Utica) | 1907 | Oil on canvas | 24 1/8 inches x 36 1/8 inches

Millie Ringgold was a gold prospector, boarding house proprietor, and long-time resident of Yogo City, just down the road from Utica. How did this self-made businesswoman find her way to central Montana?

Millie was born a slave near Chestertown, Maryland in 1845. It’s likely that she remained a slave until Maryland finally abolished slavery on November 1, 1864. After spending time in the D.C. area as a nurse for the military and working for a family, she boarded a steamboat in 1878 and traveled up the Missouri, landing in Montana. Two years later, Millie joined the Yogo gold rush in the Little Belt Mountains in Central Montana.

maps.google.com

Little Belt Mountains, maps.google.com

ringgold link to Billings Gazette

A photocopy of a photo showing Millie Ringgold in front of what is believed to have been her restaurant, bar and boarding house along Yogo Creek in the Little Belt Mountains. Billings Gazette.

After settling in Yogo City, Millie opened a boarding house, where she experienced profitable business until the gold rush boom went bust in the early 1880s. Despite this bust, Millie continued to run her boarding house. It’s said that any traveler who wrote about Millie raved about the immaculate house and dining room, which was complete with white linen and polished silver. Even though the town was nearly deserted, she kept her boarding house in good shape.

In addition to running her boarding house, Millie supplemented her income by washing for prospectors, raising some chickens and turkeys, and cooking or nursing for ranchers from time to time. If money was tight, Millie relied on the aid of her cat, George Washington. The cat could catch a rabbit for both Millie and her cat to enjoy.

Millie Ringgold

Millie Ringgold

 

Sid Richardson MuseumThe 1900 federal census listed Millie Ringgold as a prospector-owner. She never lost faith in the Yogo mines. Until her death in 1906, she continued to live alone and work her mining claims in Yogo City, sometimes hiring the help of an African American man, believed to be Abraham Carter, the only other black resident of the Yogo District listed in the 1900 census.

Likely to have encountered Ms. Ringgold during his early days in the Judith Basin, Charles Russell paid tribute to Millie Ringgold in his 1907 painting.

 

 

Keep Calm and Trail Drive On

*After the Civil War, there was a need to connect the ranchmen of Texas Longhorn cattle with the feeders and packers in northern U.S. By the 1870’s, Texas began to assume its preeminence as a source of American food, particularly beef. As such, moving cattle from grazing lands in Texas to rail terminals was an annual job.

The new Kansas Pacific railroad brought an opportunity to set up new markets for Texas cattle in northern states. Promotional maps and pamphlets were printed in large numbers between 1871 and 1875 praising the benefits of using the railroad’s services to fill the government’s demand for cattle. These “promotionals” were used to advertise the Kansas Pacific Railway, enticing drovers from the shipping centers of rival railroads, but also to promote certain towns over others.

Our current exhibit, Hide & Horn on the Chisholm Trail, features a map, guide, and book that would have been used by cowboys and cattle businessmen during the late 19th century.

MAP

Kansas Pacific Railway Company | The Best and Shortest Cattle Trail from Texas | 1873 | Map | The Rees-Jones Collection

Kansas Pacific Railway Company | The Best and Shortest Cattle Trail from Texas | 1873 | Map | The Rees-Jones Collection

On prominent display in our galleries, the map shows various cattle routes from points in Texas to Camp Concho where the L.B. Harris Trail begins and to Red River Station, which is shown as the beginning of the Ellsworth Trail.

The map was the brainchild of Englishman William Weston (1844-1920), a mining engineer who was in the area at the time railheads were competing for the cattle trade.

Maps like this one and their subsequent printed guides were distributed complimentary in Texas by the Kansas Pacific railroad’s agents and others.ellsworthThis particular map showcases the town of Ellsworth, Kansas, depicting its railhead as the most convenient by providing easy access to markets both east and west.Railroad arrows

Red arrows along the top show the direction of the Kansas Pacific and the towns in Kansas that were railheads. These towns included Ellsworth, Russell, Fort Hays, and Ellis.map correction 1

Viewers visiting our exhibit will see that the map on display has a few corrections and notes in blue ink, which were done by Texas historian-antiquarian Alexander Dienst, Jr., commenting on the crossing at the Leon River.

 In 1890 on the banks of the Leon River. The path cut deep in the steep bank of Leon was plainly visible where cattle went down the bank. The crossing at Leon River was at same place where wagon bridge spans Leon between Temple and Belton.

Alex Dienst

Temple, Texas

map correction

Dienst moved the town of Hamilton to the northwest and then moved Gatesville to where Hamilton had been placed.

When not in use, the map was folded into a stitched paper wrapper and inserted into the guide book.

GUIDE BOOK

Guide Map of the Great Texas Cattle Trail, from Red River Crossing to the Old Reliable Kansas Pacific Railway, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

Guide Map of the Great Texas Cattle Trail, from Red River Crossing to the Old Reliable Kansas Pacific Railway, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

The guide book includes a narrative and guide table. The narrative details the route and the conveniences it offers for drovers:

The abundance of grass and water; absence of ticks and mosquitoes, and the abolishment of taxes heretofore exacted by the different tribes of Indians, are facts too well known to incorporate in this article.

guidebooktable1

The narrative is followed by a guide table, which includes valuable information such as the distance between each stop, details about streams and crossings, camping grounds, good sources of water, wood, supply stores, etc. Pretty handy on a cattle drive, right?

BOOK

James Cox | Historical and Biographical Record of the Cattle Industry and the Cattlemen of Texas and Adjacent Territory | 1895 | Book | The Rees-Jones Collection

James Cox | Historical and Biographical Record of the Cattle Industry and the Cattlemen of Texas and Adjacent Territory | 1895 | Book | The Rees-Jones Collection

This compendium on Texas cattle and cattlemen is one of the rarest of Texas books. It is over 700 pages long. The first half of the volume provides some of the best accounts of the history of the Texas cattle trade.  The second half has nearly 400 pages devoted to biographies of 449 Texas cattlemen.

In addition to featuring cattlemen, the biographical section is also a great source of biographies about women in the cattle country of Texas. Many of the women were married to ranchers and participated in the business. However, some women had to forge their own way without a husband.Lucinda Dalton

As part of our Hide & Horn exhibition, these objects provide a tangible representation of an ephemeral period in Texas history, a time of “The Cowboy, As He Was, And Is, And Is Supposed to Have Been.”

*Research collected and compiled by Shelle McMillen.

 

Hide & Horn

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the legendary Chisholm Trail. Named after the Scot-Cherokee trader, Jesse Chisholm, the trail was a major route for Texas livestock. In its brief existence, the cattle drive era amounted to the greatest migration of livestock in world history, with more than 5 million cattle and 5 million mustangs moving from Texas ranches to northern markets. As waypoint along the trail, Fort Worth experienced economic growth and developed a unique Western heritage as a result.

The Best and Shortest Cattle Trail from Texas, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

The Best and Shortest Cattle Trail from Texas, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

The Sid will join the three-state (Texas, Oklahoma & Kansas) 2017 celebration of the Chisholm Trail with a cattle trail-era focus exhibition, Hide & Horn on the Chisholm Trail. The exhibit will feature collectors’ items about the greatest migration of livestock in world history. On loan from the Rees-Jones Collection in Dallas, visitors will view an 1873 trail map and guidebook for drovers, one of the four most important books on the cattle industry, and one of the best books about the Texas Longhorn cattle breed during the 19th century.

Guide Map of the Great Texas Cattle Trail, from Red River Crossing to the Old Reliable Kansas Pacific Railway, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

Guide Map of the Great Texas Cattle Trail, from Red River Crossing to the Old Reliable Kansas Pacific Railway, Kansas Pacific Railway Company, St. Louis, MO: Levison & Blythe, 1873, Rees-Jones Collection

Historical and Biographical Record of the Cattle Industry and the Cattlemen of Texas and Adjacent Territory, James Cox (1851-1901), St. Louis, MO: Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co., 1895, Rees-Jones Collection

Historical and Biographical Record of the Cattle Industry and the Cattlemen of Texas and Adjacent Territory, James Cox (1851-1901), St. Louis, MO: Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co., 1895, Rees-Jones Collection

The Longhorns, J. Frank Dobie (1888-1964), Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1941, Inscription by J. Frank Dobie to Sid Richardson, March 12, 1942, Sid Richardson Museum

The Longhorns, J. Frank Dobie (1888-1964), Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1941, Inscription by J. Frank Dobie to Sid Richardson, March 12, 1942, Sid Richardson Museum

Hide and Horn on the Chisholm Trail opens Friday, January 6.

Celebrate Good Times, Come On!

Cultural Awareness

Dr. Laura Evans from UNT leading training on cultivating critical cultural awareness through art.

Dr. David Cross from TCU guides our class through the various stages of child brain development.

Dr. David Cross from TCU guides our class through the various stages of child brain development.

The end of the year is a time for reflection and review. In the education department, much of our attention has been on training a new class of docents at the Sid. Over the course of 13 weeks we have learned so much. Scholars from near and far have taught us about the background of two iconic artists of the American West, Frederic Remington and Charles Russell, as well as the history surrounding the time period in which these two artists lived and worked.

Educators and psychologists have opened our eyes and minds to the experiences of our visitors whether through differences in culture, language, or age. Staff has guided our new teammates through the nuts & bolts of crafting and leading tours, providing an opportunity for each docent in training to practice their new skills. And I’m happy to announce that we have nine talented new docents ready and willing to help share the Sid Richardson Museum with you, our visitor!

New Docent Gayle Massey leading a practice tour presentation.

New Docent Gayle Massey leading a practice tour presentation.

New docent Irene Parker leading a practice tour presentation.

New Docent Irene Parker leading a practice tour presentation.

New Docent Beth Haynes leading a practice tour presentation.

New Docent Beth Haynes leading a practice tour presentation.

We recently celebrated the contributions of all of our docents this year at our Annual Docent Luncheon. Andrea Hassenteuffel, Director of School and Family Programs, took a moment to reflect and share our gratitude and appreciation for this amazing group of people who volunteered countless hours to serving our community and sharing Sid’s great collection with such a wide and diverse audience.

In thinking about each docent individually, Andrea imagined what Sid would think if he were alive today. Then she pondered, what qualities do Sid and our docents have in common? Using Sid W. Richardson’s name as a guide, Andrea found just the right words that not only describe Sid but our docent team.

Self-less

Innovative

Dedicated

Willing

Reliable

Intelligent

Cool & calm

Hospitable

Able

Ready

Diligent

Sincere

Open-minded

Noteworthy

All together, these individual talents create a pretty amazing team. Thank you, docents, for all you do for the Sid Richardson Museum. And congratulations Docent Class of 2016!

Annual Docent Luncheon 2016

Annual Docent Luncheon 2016

For Love of Russell

This month we are celebrating the 10th anniversary of “For Love of Russell,” a one-woman monologue of the life of cowboy artist Charles Russell as told by his wife and business manager, Nancy Cooper Russell. Visitors have an opportunity to experience the performance every Second Saturday of the month.Cowgirl Visit

The role of Nancy Cooper Russell is performed by one of our museum docents, Roberta Atkins. Roberta has been with the museum since the institution first embarked on a docent program in 1999. In 2005, when the museum closed for renovations, Roberta began to conceive and write what became the “For Love of Russell” monologue based on research about Nancy and her relationship with Charles Russell. After the museum re-opened in November 2006, Roberta performed for a museum audience for the first time.

In 2012, Roberta reached her 100th performance, a feat that did not go unnoticed. To celebrate this special milestone, Sid Richardson Foundation president, Pete Geren, surprised Roberta by dressing up as Charles Russell. Nancy and Charlie were reunited at last!Charles & Nancy 2012

The Sid Richardson Museum is blessed to have such a gifted group of docents.  Thank you, Roberta, for sharing your time and talents with our visitors! Happy 10th Anniversary, Nancy Cooper Russell!Roberta1

 

Whoa, We’re Halfway There

This fall, the Sid Richardson Museum embarked on a new class of docents. Having started our extensive docent training in September, I’m happy to report that we’re halfway through our course! What have we learned so far?

DocentIntro

Our new docent class leading mini tours on the first day of training!

Eleven future docents were introduced to the museum collection & staff, and jumped right in to their new role by sharing what they learned about Sid Richardson through various pieces in the museum collection.

The docent class had the great fortunate to learn about the artwork and time period represented in our collection through various prestigious visiting speakers. Dr. Brian Dippie, one of the preeminent scholars on Charles Russell and author of the Sid Richardson Museum collection book, traveled across the border to speak with us all the way from Canada. Likewise, Peter Hassrick, editor of the recently published Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonné II, sojourned from his post as Director Emeritus and Senior Scholar at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming to speak with our docents about the iconic Western artist. Most recently, we learned more about the era of transformation during the late 19th and early 20th centuries from Dr. Mark Thistlethwaite, the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, who helped us situate Remington & Russell within the broader context of American art history.

 

Dr. Brian Dippie discussing Charles Russell with our new docent class.

Dr. Brian Dippie discussing Charles Russell with our new docent class.

In addition to scholarship, we’ve been learning all different tools of the trade like conversational interpretation, or how to talk with visitors about the artworks on display. We also had a fun “speed dating” class in which our docents had a chance to do each of the studio activities that are offered to our student visitor during their school tours at the Sid. We have some talented artists in our midst!

Kenny Haussenteuffel guiding our docents on best practices for working with ELL students.

Kenny Haussenteuffel guiding our docents on best practices for working with ELL students.

This week, we stepped into the shoes of English Language Learners, as Kenny Hassenteuffel, a former dual language school teacher, led a discussion of artworks from our collection in Spanish. Through this exercise, Mr. Hassenteuffel was able to demonstrate ways in which we can help create meaningful museum experiences for our ELL visitors. And we learned a little Spanish along the way!

Although we’ve covered quite a lot of material, we still have 7 more weeks of training to go. Our docents will learn things like cultural awareness in art museums, child development, tour themes, and how to craft a tour. Each new docent will end their training with a practice tour presentation. We can’t wait to let them shine!

The Ocean of Sunrise

Fall is just around the corner and with it comes a new season of Tea & Talk. This program is geared towards adults who are interested in slowing down their art viewing process and digging a little deeper into our collection (and for those who enjoy a good cup of a tea afterwards!). For our first Tea & Talk of the 2016-2017 season we viewed and discussed a portrait painted by Charles Francis Browne, Nai-U-Chi: Chief of the Bow, Zuni 1895.

Tea & Talk, September 2016, Sid Richardson Museum

Tea & Talk, September 2016, Sid Richardson Museum

Charles Francis Browne, Nai-U-Chi: Chief Of The Bow, Zuni 1895, 1895, Oil on canvas, 18 1/2 x 12 3/4 inches

Charles Francis Browne, Nai-U-Chi: Chief Of The Bow, Zuni 1895, 1895, Oil on canvas, 18 1/2 x 12 3/4 inches

As noted in the title, Nai-U-Chi was part of the Zuni, which are a federally recognized American Indian tribe and one of the Pueblo peoples. Today, most Zuni live in Western New Mexico. Traditionally, the Zuni were an agricultural community.

Studio portrait of a delegation of five Zunis and a Hopi brought to Washington by Frank Hamilton Cushing. Standing, left to right: Naiyutchi (Nai-uchi); Nanahe (Na-na-he), a Hopi adopted by the Zuni; Kiasiwa (Ki-a-si). Seated, left to right: Laiyuahtsailunkya (Lai-yu-ah-tsai-lun-kya); Governor Laiyuaitsailus (Hai-ya-ah-tsai-hi or Pedro Pino); Governor Pah-lo-wah-ti-wa (Patricio Pino). Men are wearing traditional clothing, including leather leggings, beaded necklaces, concha belts, and cloth headbands. 1882. Photo by John K. Hillers. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution (P03402)

Studio portrait of a delegation of five Zunis and a Hopi brought to Washington by Frank Hamilton Cushing. Standing, left to right: Naiyutchi (Nai-uchi); Nanahe (Na-na-he), a Hopi adopted by the Zuni; Kiasiwa (Ki-a-si). Seated, left to right: Laiyuahtsailunkya (Lai-yu-ah-tsai-lun-kya); Governor Laiyuaitsailus (Hai-ya-ah-tsai-hi or Pedro Pino); Governor Pah-lo-wah-ti-wa (Patricio Pino). Men are wearing traditional clothing, including leather leggings, beaded necklaces, concha belts, and cloth headbands. 1882. Photo by John K. Hillers. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution (P03402)

Nai-U-Chi was a member of the Bow Priesthood, a group that exerted considerable power within Zuni life. During Tea & Talk, many participants commented on the various details they saw in the portrait: the red cloth headband, what appears to be a linen-like top, and a sash decorated with unidentified objects. What are those gray objects adorning the sash? Are they arrowheads? After the program, I consulted some of our knowledgeable museum staff and discovered that the artifacts on Nai-U-Chi’s clothing were shark teeth!

Charles Francis Browne | Nai-U-Chi: Chief Of The Bow, Zuni 1895 | detail

Charles Francis Browne | Nai-U-Chi: Chief Of The Bow, Zuni 1895 | detail

How did a man living in New Mexico in the late 19th century acquire shark teeth? Unfortunately, I have not been able to confirm in print where or how Nai-U-Chi came to possess these items. One must consider a likely possibility that by the time of this portrait, 1895, the Zuni, as with many other native groups, were regularly trading with Americans and other travelers. Another possibility involves a pilgrimage to the Atlantic Ocean.

Most of what we know about Nai-U-Chi is from records of Frank Hamilton Cushing, a pioneering anthropologist associated with the Smithsonian Institution who lived with the Zuni from 1879-1884. Mr. Cushing learned that for many years it had been a dream of some of the Zuni chiefs to visit the East, a land of fable to see “the Ocean of Sunrise.” Living in the dry lands of New Mexico, the Zuni believed their prayers brought clouds from the ocean in the east, clouds that would give them rain.

Many other nearby tribes had had representatives visit Washington, D.C. – the Apaches, the Navajos, but not the Zuni. So Cushing guided a group of Zuni men East, as accounted in an article published in an 1882 issue of The Century Magazine. Eventually, the group made it to their final destination in Boston, selected so as to be as far east as possible.

Upon arriving at the ocean, Nai-U-Chi led the party in a ceremony, scattering sacred meal, which was composed of corn meal and finely ground precious seashells, over the waves. Nai-U-Chi concluded the ceremony with a prayer in which “consideration was asked for the children of the Zunis, of the Americans, and of all men, of the beasts and birds of the world, and of even the creeping and most vile beings of earth, and the most insignificant.”

Portrait of Nai-Uchi (Elder Brother of the Bow Priest) in Native Dress with Squash Blossom Necklace and Ornaments 1879. Photographed by John K. Hillers. National Anthropological Archives. NAA INV 06370200 OPPS NEG 02233 A.

Portrait of Nai-Uchi (Elder Brother of the Bow Priest) in Native Dress with Squash Blossom Necklace and Ornaments 1879. Photographed by John K. Hillers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. NAA INV 06370200 OPPS NEG 02233 A.

During Tea & Talk, I asked the group what they might infer about the sitter or how they would describe the sitter in Charles Browne’s portrait of Nai-U-Chi. Someone said they imagined him to be an important man. Another participant admitted to feeling respect for the man. In one of the few written descriptions I have found of Nai-U-Chi, he was described as having “a genial, contemplative look, a kindly placidity of countenance, and he was full of poetry, telling folk lore stories charmingly.” I like to imagine what stories Nai-U-Chi could have told us had we had the chance to sit with him longer.

Tea & Talk, September 2016, Sid Richardson Museum

Tea & Talk, September 2016, Sid Richardson Museum

Tea & Talk is a free monthly program, offered the 1st Wednesday of every month at noon from September-May. I hope to see you next time!

Dedicated Docents: Nancy C.

As we gear up for a new class of docents this fall, we want to shine the spotlight on our volunteers who continue to dedicate their time serving the community through the museum.  On today’s “Dedicated Docent” blog series, I’d like to introduce you to Nancy C.nancy C
SRM
: What drew you to the Sid Richardson Museum?

Nancy: This museum is a wonderful smaller museum that houses amazing Western Art by Charles Russell and Frederic Remington with other western painters.  I have the privilege to know the Director of the Museum and another docent, and they got me interested in discovering more about this museum by becoming a docent.

SRM: What do you want visitors to get out of the tour?

Nancy: I want the visitors to the Sid Richardson Museum to learn about the past.  What the “wild west” or “the old west” eras were about.  Russell and Remington were there and they painted the times they knew were no longer going to be there.  The school students have so much fun, they get to experience art and create an art project during their visit to the museum.

SRM: What are some of your most memorable tour moments?

Nancy: Our students who visit are my favorite!  Some have never been to an art museum; the science museum perhaps but not here.  We have the opportunity to open their minds and hearts and create a new experience for them.  They learn that our paintings tell stories, and are pictures of what our history is about.  It is very rewarding when they learn that by using their imagination they can understand that the paintings have sound, light and movement.  I also participate in the museum’s special events and adult tours.  These groups have a different take on art, and I have the opportunity to share with them the best of what I know about the art we have.

SRM: How has being a docent changed you?

Nancy: Being a docent I have learned many new things:  how bronze statues were created in the late 19th century, how to view art though children’s eyes, and most of all how to just enjoy art.  Art doesn’t always need to be analyzed. Does the art move me? Just enjoy art for art’s sake.

SRM: What’s your favorite part of the job?

Nancy: My favorite part of being a docent is learning new things, new projects, new ways to view history, new ways to teach children about art, and being part of a wonderful museum such as the Sid Richardson Museum.

 

If you are interested in becoming a docent and are curious to learn more about the docent program, please join us next Monday, August 8th @10am for a Prospective Docent Coffee. Our next Docent Class begins September 12. Applications are due by August 12.

Summer at the Sid

School’s out, summer is in, let the drama stop and the ART begin!Campers3

What a wonderful time we have had with our Summer Art Camps! This year we hosted two, week-long camps: one for children between the ages of 6-9 years old and the other for tweens (10-13 years old). This year’s theme was Traveling Through the West!Campers1Campers2

Each day, camp began with a sketchbook warm-up to help jump-start their creativity. Campers spent time each day in the gallery looking at artworks from our permanent collection with the help of our docents. They also spent time in the studio daily creating their own works of art. Campers created several projects in the studio: air-dry clay pots/vases, acrylic painted landscapes, watercolor wildflowers, weavings, designing a brand and decorating a bandana, chalk pastel portraits and animal portraits. They were challenged to look closer, draw bigger, and explore their ideas and subjects!Campers 5Campers 6Campers 7

Students also learned about what life was like in the West, who they might have seen, what they might have heard and saw, and discussed how they might have felt if they had traveled West. Campers spent time considering many perspectives of the West: the artist, the settler, the American Indian, the cowboy, and even the Pony Express Rider. These perspectives were explored through story-telling, reading, gallery activities and games, looking exercises, and dialog with our team and their peers. Our campers were so eager to learn and were a delight to have with us this summer!Campers 4

Each camp finished with an art show. Campers invited their families and friends to join us at the Museum to take a tour and celebrate their artwork created at camp! Campers even went through some “junior” docent training so that they could facilitate the tour for their visitors. At the end of the art show campers were able to collect their artworks, but not before enjoying some delicious goodies…what would a kids’ art show be without cupcakes and cookies?!Campers 9art showCampers 8

We are already in anticipation for next summer! Thank you campers for joining us! It was fun learning and creating together!

 

Andrea Hassenteuffel, Director of School & Family Programs

Farewell, Gus and Captain Call!

On Sunday, Fort Worth bid farewell to Gus and Captain Call and the Lonesome Dove Reunion and Trail.End of LD Wagon2h

Thanks to Mayor Betsy Price’s vision, our community has had numerous opportunities this spring to enjoy treasures from the Lonesome Dove Collection, permanently held at the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University (TSU) in San Marcos. TSU, the Fort Worth Convention & Visitors Bureau and generous sponsors and partners brought the beloved Western Lonesome Dove to our city via exhibits, screenings and panel discussions with cast and crew. The Trail featured costumes, props, and photographs from the Lonesome Dove Production Archive.

The Sid Richardson Museum in Sundance Square was the Trail’s kickoff site and host for the exhibition Lonesome Dove: The Art of Story. More than 27,000 visitors from 50 states and 22 countries traced the path of Lonesome Dove, from Larry McMurtry’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to the movie script, and they explored the American West through Frederic Remington and Charles Russell artworks, a cowboy’s cattle-drive diary, and objects from the Lonesome Dove archives.

If you missed this exceptional opportunity, the Trail continues at the Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, through July 23. It’ll be worth the ride!

Mary E. Burke, Director